New ways to explore the paintings

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New ways to explore the paintings

The next time you visit the Pannett Art Gallery you can explore some of the paintings in a number of different ways thanks to a small grant from Museums Development Yorkshire (MDY).

As part of this project the curator talked to Whitby DAG and WHISH (Whitby Support and Help for children with Hidden Impairments) to develop a range of resources, including tactile handling objects, to encourage visitors to look more closely and gain a greater understanding of the paintings.

Families from WHISH visited the Pannett for two craft workshops, looking closely at the pictures and helping the gallery to choose which paintings to concentrate on. From these workshops four different resources were created.

You may have seen people wearing white gloves to pick up a museum exhibit or painting. This is because one of the greatest causes of damage to artwork is the dirt, soap, chemicals and grease from being touched, however clean your hands are. This is one of the reasons why museums don’t allow people to touch their objects or paintings. However, the texture of paint in some pictures really contributes to the mood or emotion of the subject. To help visitors understand what an oil painting feels like members of Whitby Art Society have created oil painted canvases and boards so you can now feel the texture of an oil painting.

For the same reason the beautiful Burne Jones Tapestries on display in the Weatherill Gallery at Pannett Art Gallery are behind glass. This is frustrating for anyone who loves textiles, so the gallery commissioned weaver Dr Jenny Cousens to create a sample of woven tapestry in the style of the Arts and Crafts movement. The sample allows visitors to handle an example of weaving showing the materials and the techniques that Victorian craft designers would have used.

Four simple jigsaw puzzles have been made to encourage younger visitors to look more closely at the paintings.
Many of the paintings in the Pannett Collection, including some beautiful Weatherill miniatures, contain intricate details that can easily be missed by the casual viewer. It is also difficult to appreciate the amazing brushstrokes in some paintings.

Vinyl Signs of Whitby have helped the gallery to create enlarged versions of sections of some paintings to assist visitors to see these details more easily. This also makes these paintings more accessible to visitors with a visual impairment.

One of the young participants in the WHISH workshop

One of the young participants in the WHISH workshop

WHISH workshop participants

WHISH workshop participants

WHISH workshop oil painting textures

WHISH workshop oil painting textures

WHISH workshop participants

WHISH workshop participants

Whitby Art Society Exhibition

Whitby Art Society

Whitby Art Society Exhibition

31 March 2017 – 07 May 2017

Whitby Art Society has been in existence for more than 40 years and currently has about 90 members. Most members practice art in some form – mainly painting in a variety of mediums. Some members work in ceramics, printing or sculpture and various forms of material design, whilst others appreciate and enjoy art for its own sake.

Whitby Art Society holds an annual selling exhibition every Spring at the Pannett Art Gallery.

Why not come along, enjoy the artwork and perhaps buy something special for your home?

 

You can view work from just a small selection of Whitby Art Society members in the gallery below.

 

'Seasons Drypoint Etching' by Jan Stead

Seasons, Drypoint Etching by Jan Stead

Hidden Treasures

Hidden Treasures of the Pannett Art Gallery

Hidden Treasures of the Pannett Art Gallery

Come and see some of the hidden treasures from the Pannett Art Gallery Collection.

The Pannett Art Gallery cares for many more paintings than the works on regular display in the Staithes and Weatherill Galleries.

Through the winter months we take the opportunity to show some of these paintings and each year we aim to show a different selection of these works.

The exhibition includes recent acquisitions as well as old favourites from the collection.

Howey, John William, 1873-1938; Sailing Boats on the River

Sailing Boats on the River by John William Howey.

Pawson, Ronald Sheard, 1916-1977; Fleeting Light

Fleeting Light by Ronald  Pawson

Maritime Theme

Many of the works are on a maritime theme, including Fleeting Light by Ronald Pawson (above) and Sailing Boats on the River by John William Howey.

Local Lanterns on Display

Local Lanterns on Display

Local Lanterns on Display

For a limited period of time 12 lanterns from Whitby Town Council’s Whitby Christmas Festival community lantern parade will be on display at the Pannett Art Gallery.

These amazing lanterns are quite large scale. The tall ones stand at over five foot high and the boats are over five and a half foot long. The two sections of the Whitby lighthouse and pier are a total of over eight foot long. These attractive, brightly coloured lanterns were beautifully lit up with LED lighting during the parade, but even in the gallery they make quite an impression.

Seven local schools worked with local theatre company Animated Objects to create these spectacular lanterns which include representations of iconic Whitby sights. The groups of young people who created these sculptural lights then carried their creations from Pannett Art Gallery to the Marina Car Park in a procession that attracted over 700 people on the night of Friday 18th November.
Stakesby Community Primary School made two beach hut lanterns in red and yellow, and a further blue beach hut was created by West Cliff Primary School along with the magnificent set of Whale bones. Pupils from East Whitby Community Primary School created the Whitby Abbey lantern in three sections and the light house lantern was created in two sections by the pupils of Airy Hill Community Primary School.

The fantastic Whitby Lifeboat was recreated as a lantern by the pupils of St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School along with a green fishing boat and the red and blue fishing boats were made by pupils of Ruswarp Church of England Primary School.

The Whitby Festival logo, designed by Media Vision, was recreated as a lantern at a workshop at Eastside Community Centre and the pupils of Eskdale School made a beautiful Christmas Tree lantern.

Animated Objects also ran a workshop at Whitby Library where participants made their own individual lanterns.

So if you missed the parade or you would like a closer look at the lanterns then come along to the Pannett Art Gallery before the winter break. The Gallery is open Tuesday – Sunday 9.30am – 4.30pm, Closed Mondays. Please note last admission to the Gallery is half an hour before closing time.

The Gallery will be closed 23rd December until 2nd January, re-opening on Tuesday 3rd January 2017.

Stakesby Community Primary School made two beach hut lanterns in red and yellow, and a further blue beach hut was created by West Cliff Primary School along with the magnificent set of Whale bones

Stakesby Community Primary School made two beach hut lanterns in red and yellow, and a further blue beach hut was created by West Cliff Primary School.

West Cliff Primary School created this magnificent set of Whale bones

West Cliff Primary School created this magnificent set of Whale bones.

The fantastic Whitby Lifeboat was recreated as a lantern by the pupils of St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School

The fantastic Whitby Lifeboat was recreated as a lantern by the pupils of St Hilda’s Roman Catholic Primary School

New Picture for the Pannett Art Gallery

Archives

New Picture for the Pannett Art Gallery

The Pannett Art Gallery cares for a fantastic collection of paintings, but every now and again it is given the opportunity to extend the collection.

The gallery has a strict acquisitions policy, but if a painting meets these stringent criteria and would benefit the collection then it will try to acquire new work.

Towards the end of last year just such an opportunity arose and the gallery is now the proud owner of a small sketch by Robert Jobling, (1841 – 1923), one of the Staithes Group of Artists, that shows some of his ideas and exploratory drawings for a future painting.

The watercolour and pencil Sketch, called “Cattle Studies near the North Yorkshire Moors” is a working drawing of cows from five different views. It illustrates how an artist might explore one image a number of times before deciding on what to include in the final composition.

Seeing an artist’s preparatory drawings can also give an insight into the process the artist has used to explore and improve their drawing techniques. Being able to study these designs can help the viewer gain a greater understanding of the paintings on display.

Originally from Newcastle, Robert Jobling was mainly known as a marine, landscape and figure painter, painting in both oil and watercolour.

The Pannett Art Gallery has two other watercolour paintings by Robert Jobling on display in the Staithes Gallery, “A Street in Staithes” and “Waiting for the Return of the Fishing Fleet”, as well as the beautiful oil painting “Staithes”.

Robert married Isa (Isabella Thompson 1851 – 1926) in 1893 after his first wife, Annie Chambers, died in 1892. Isa was already a talented and established artist by this time, and she also became a member of the Staithes Group of Artists. This was a tremendous achievement in Victorian times. But marrying Robert and taking care of his four children would have had a significant impact on her career as an artist. Nevertheless, the Gallery also has on display two artworks by Isa, an oil painting “Girl in a Cottage Garden” and an exquisite etching, “The Goose Girl”.

You can see all these art works and many more beautiful paintings by the Staithes Group of Artists when you visit the Pannett Art Gallery. The Gallery is open Tuesday – Sunday, 9.30am – 4.30pm.
Last admission is half an hour before closing.

For level access to the gallery please use the entrance at the back of the museum.

For further information about visiting the gallery please phone 01947 600933.
The Art Gallery is in the process of developing a new web site which will be available soon.

Watercolour and pencil Sketch, “Cattle Studies near the North Yorkshire Moors”. Robert Jobling

Watercolour and pencil Sketch, “Cattle Studies near the North Yorkshire Moors”. Robert Jobling 

Robert Jobling - detail

Robert Jobling – detail